Tag Archives: Brian McLaren

Guest Review – The Great Spiritual Migration

The Great Spiritual Migration: How the World’s Largest Religion is Seeking a Better Way To Be Christian by Brian D. McLaren
Reviewed by Rev. Matthew J. Seargeant

As a former Christian conservative pastor, Brian McLaren has some perspective and insight into the mindset of that tradition. Yet, some of his recent publications have set him at odds with past allies, many of whom have branded him a heretic. In The Great Spiritual Migration, McLaren points out some troubling aspects of modern Christianity, while contending (accurately, I believe) that these are often the result of poor scholarship and bad theology. Perhaps most importantly, he reminds us that while this faith has traditionally been about movement (a journey), as well as evolution of thought and action, the Church is designed for self-preservation, institutionalization, and stagnation. This has led to a migration away from the Church, toward a more organic [my word] spirituality. McLaren believes the Church can and should find a way to step into this void. He continually suggests that following Jesus requires us to act in love and inclusivity. And, while he doesn’t offer easy solutions, I believe his hope is to open the eyes of the reader to the reality facing Christianity, and to help lead toward intentional work toward solutions for the future.

52 Books in 52 Weeks – Week #21

Religion Month Encore

Why Did Jesus, Moses, the Buddha and Mohammed Cross the RoadWhy Did Jesus, Moses, the Buddha, and Mohammed Cross the Road?: Christian Identity in a Multi-Faith World by Brian D. McLaren

Total Reading Time: 3.25 hours

Review: Why can’t we all just get along? No, seriously, why not? Rev. McLaren makes a passionately persuasive argument that it is imperative to ameliorate the horrible hostility among religions and the religious/nonreligious. He advocates a position that he himself admits is radical and subversive: that we can share our faith without requiring conversion and in return we should gratefully receive the treasures offered by other faiths without feeling the need to convert. It would be a complete paradigm shift from the current religious atmosphere of “I’m right and you’re going to hell.” It’s completely necessary and we can do it without losing all that is good about our respective beliefs, without losing our Christian identity. Because guess what? That’s how Jesus, Moses, the Buddha and Mohammed would do it.