Tag Archives: The Death Class

Best Books I Read in 2014

Looking for some books to read this year? Here are my 15 favorite books from my reading list in 2014, ordered by date finished.

1. Fangirl by Rainbow Rowell
Fangirl

2. Amy & Roger’s Epic Detour by Morgan Matson
Amy and Roger's Epic Detour

3. The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman
The Ocean at the End of the Lane

4. The Death Class: A True Story About Life by Erica Hayasaki
The Death Class: A True Story About Life

5. Judging a Book by Its Lover: A Field Guide to the Hearts and Minds of Readers Everywhere by Lauren Leto
Judging a Book by Its Lover

6. The Nethergrim by Matthew Jobin
The Nethergrim

7. Looking for Alaska by John Green
Looking for Alaska

8. We Were Liars by E. Lockhart
We Were Liars

9. Stormdancer by Jay Kristoff
Stormdancer

10. A Share in Death by Deborah Crombie
A Share in Death

11. Isla and the Happily Ever After by Stephanie Perkins
Isla and the Happily Ever After

12. Stuff Matters: Exploring the Marvelous Materials that Shape Our Man-Made World by Mark Miodownik
Stuff Matters

13. The Blood of Olympus by Rick Riordan
The Blood of Olympus

14. Seconds by Bryan Lee O’Malley
Seconds

15. The Salinger Contract by Adam Langer
The Salinger Contract

 

Dori & Jess’ Book Club Reviews The Death Class

This month’s installment of Dori & Jess’ Book Club…

cvr9781451642858_9781451642858_hr.JPGThe Death Class: A True Story About Life by Erica Hayasaki

Review: Erica Hayasaki, a journalist for the “Los Angeles Times,” shadowed Dr. Norma Bowe for four years as Dr. Bowe taught her “Death in Perspective” class at Kean University. Dr. Bowe’s class includes discussions on what occurs biologically when a person is dying of natural causes, trips to a cemetery, prison and end-of-life hospital, and assignments like writing a goodbye letter to someone you know who has died and writing your own bucket list. The interspersed assignments and real responses from the class were interesting and thought-provoking.  The book also included the life stories of a few of Dr. Bowe’s student which helped make the book more about living than dying and illustrating different ways people deal with death but Dori & I both agree that it would have been better with shorter stories about more students rather than singling out just a few. However, there is no question that both of us were impressed by the remarkable woman that is Dr. Norma Bowe and we were glad to have the opportunity to read about her.